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José Clemente Orozco

He was born in 1883, in Zapotlan el Grande, Jalisco. However, when he was 7 years old, he moved to Mexico City, where he became interested in painting.

When he was young, on his way to school, he would walk by the shop of José Guadalupe Posada, the creator of La Catrina. Seeing him work on his drawings, inspired Orozco to sketch his first figures and take drawing classes at the San Carlos Fine Arts Academy in the evening.

From 1911 to 1916, he started as a cartoonist of some newspapers' publications and started to work in wall paintings, a technique he managed to develop quickly.

After the Cristero War, Guadalajara struggled with inequality and fascism. Orozco would illustrate these social issues; man in its glory and its misery. He criticised this terrible violence, wether it happened during the pre-hispanic times, during the spanish conquest or in current México.

He is considered as one of the 20th century Mexican painting pioneers along with Diego Rivera and David Alfaro Siqueiros. José Clemente Orozco was a mentor to other Mexican artists, as he let them free themselves and to widen their vision and technique. He never followed scales or esthetical limitations.

At the age of 21, he lost his left hand due to a gunpowder accident. Even then, Orozco dominated muralism, engraving, and easel techniques.

Some of his most remarkable artwork is really close from here, you could visit places like:

  1. •The Instituto Cultural Cabañas, which shelters 57 murals painted by Jose Clemente Orozco, among these, you can find one of master pieces, "Hombre en Llamas" (Man of Fire).

  2. •The Palacio de Gobierno (Capitol Building) is home to one of the most iconic murals by this painter. He paid tribute to one of the most influential political leaders in Mexican History: Father Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla..

  3. •The Enrique Diaz de Leon Auditorium, which is part of Guadalajara's Art Museum (MUSA). Its dome is one of the most important murals: "El Hombre Creador y Rebelde" (The Creative and Rebelius Man).

  4. •The Jose Clemente Orozco's Workshop-Museum in Calle Aurelio Aceves #27. This was the last house in Guadalajara where he lived and it preserves part of his legacy.

We hope you enjoy the city by visiting and learning about legacy of the Honorable Citizens of Jalisco.